What We’re Reading: HQ2 B’vue, YIMBY Bill Passes, and Fly Less

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Utrecht’s for bikes: How did the Dutch make Utrecht a paradise for people biking?

The airport effect: Two hotels are planned right nearby of Paine Field Airport ($).

App-based storage: Now there is an Airbnb for storage.

HQ2 B’vue: Amazon will build a 43-story tower in Bellevue ($), the city’s tallest building.

Consequences: Vancouver rejected a rezone for 21 townhouse rental units so now the property will be redeveloped for a massive mansion.

Free Hong Kong: Will Hong Kong enact a decongestion charge?

Regulate Airbnb: European cities are struggling with the effects of Airbnb and fear that their powers to regulate it may be taken away.

Generational shift: Do Millennials love sprawl? Not really.

Student housing approved: Despite objections from Everett Community College, a 124-unit private student housing project will move forward in Everett ($).

Boise’s for backyard cottage: Backyard cottages just go easier to build in Boise.

YIMBY bill passes: Oregon has passed a major missing middle housing bill, which makes it easier to build duplexes, triplexes, and fourplexes in cities across the state.

Worsening smog: Fixing the smog problem in California will top $14 billion.

Combating climate change: Despite obstruction by the far right in the Oregon state legislature, the state’s governor intends to move forward with climate action.

Shipping container tower: The world’s tallest building made of shipping containers will be built in London.

At the bottom?: Has Vancouver’s housing market reached the cyclical bottom?

Fly less: Dutch airline KLM is urging people to be conscious of their environmental impact from flying and maybe not doing it all.

Major omission: Seattle students will learn about tribes in Washington, but not the local Duwamish.

Bus stop fixes: CityLab highlights five brilliant bus stop fixes.

Over-hyped: Congress may give the hyperloop pipe dream $5 million for further study in Great Lakes Region.

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Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He is especially interested in how policies, regulations, and programs can promote positive outcomes for communities. Stephen lives in Kenmore and primarily covers land use and transportation issues for The Urbanist.