What We’re Reading: Deeply Unreliable Buses, Inslee for Gov, and Sea Level Rise

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Heat islands: India’s cities are becoming urban heat islands.

Highway removal: There isn’t much left of the viaduct, but take a peek at its demise.

Protected intersection: The East Coast’s first protected bike lane intersection is coming to suburban Silver Springs, Maryland.

Deeply unreliable: Which routes are the least reliable in the King County Metro network?

New biz: A new business group is forming in Capitol Hill.

Geography of grads: Which cities do the most and fewest college grads live in America?

SUVs kill: A British transportation safety official has suggested a ban on dangerous SVUs.

Growing cities: The fastest growing cities in America probably aren’t where you think they are.

Inslee for Governor: Washington Governor Jay Inslee has called it quits in his bid for the presidency instead turning his attention to a third term as governor.

Trimming analysis: The United States Department of Transportation plans to limit the information required in infrastructure Environmental Impact Statements.

E-scooters in Chicago: A new pilot program for electric scooters appears to be popular in low-income, transit-weak districts in Chicago.

Parking regs: Port Angeles could end up passing a proposal to nix parking requirements.

Uneven prosperity: While Downtown St. Louis booming, black communities are being razed.

Sea level rise: Egypt’s second largest city could fall victim to climate change and rising sea levels.

Blue WA: How did Washington turn politically blue?

Houston bond measure: Houston residents could vote to approve a major bond for transit expansion in November.

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Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He is especially interested in how policies, regulations, and programs can promote positive outcomes for communities. Stephen lives in Kenmore and primarily covers land use and transportation issues for The Urbanist.