What We’re Reading: Renton’s Misguided Bill, Tony Hsieh’s Legacy, and Develop and Tax

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Fighting a tax: Seattle’s chamber of commerce is suing the City over a new payroll tax on wealthy companies.

HUD pick: President-elect Joe Biden has selected Rep. Marcia Fudge as nominee to lead the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Renton’s misguided bill: Renton is moving forward with an anti-homeless shelter bill that could put patrons in the Red Lion hotel on the street. A patron of the shelter explains why the city must keep it open and fears what closure or partial closure might mean for him.

Columbia River bridge: A new bridge crossing the Columbia River near Hood River will have bike lanes, but will they be wide enough?

Clogging roads: Streetsblog explains how same-day shipping is clogging roads.

Pedestrianized French Quarter: New Orleans is looking at how the French Quarter could be more pedestrian-focused.

Outdated sewage systems: Outdated sewage treatment technologies are leading to environmental outcomes in Puget Sound.

Expanding disclosures: The Seattle City Council could expand lobbying disclosure requirements.

Finding funding: The Seattle Department of Transportation is trying to figure out funding to make the Stay Healthy Streets program permanent.

Melbourne’s housing plan: Melbourne is going to allocate city-owned property for significant housing development with 25% of units being set aside for affordable housing purposed.

Tony Hsieh’s legacy: Tony Hsieh, owner of Zappos, recently passed away but he invested heavily in Downtown Las Vegas, a legacy he leaves behind.

ADUs are booming: Sightline reports on how land use reforms have led to a skyrocket in accessory dwelling unit permits.

New ferry terminal: The new Mukilteo ferry terminal is poised to open ($) at the end of the month.

Banning outdoor dining: Los Angeles County recently shut down outdoor dining as Covid cases rise, but some question the data for doing so.

Ditching a project: Uber had been pursuing an autonomous vehicle project but has passed that off to a third-party ($).

Kyoto aesthetic: Kyoto has a unique law that results in buildings and signs to reflect a culturally preferred color.

Gateway Program: A key rail connection between New Jersey and New York has gotten state funding.

Weaning off gas: Sightline argues that Northwest states need to work together to plan for a move away from gas energy.

Ad policy change: King County is banning fossil fuel ads on Metro buses ($).

Develop and tax: One way to get more transit is to develop and tax land around stations.

Stop evictions: Public health and housing advocates argue that Washington’s eviction moratorium needs to be extended or Covid crisis will be even worse.

New CT CEO: Ric Ilgenfritz, a long-time Sound Transit staffer, will become Community Transit’s next Chief Executive Officer ($).

Fare integration: Will the San Francisco Bay Area finally pursue true fare integration among the dozens of local transit agencies?

Divesting from oil: The State of New York is divesting pension investments from fossil fuel companies ($).

Green fleet advocacy: Environmental groups in the Washington, D.C. area are asking that the main transit operator, WMATA, to electrify the bus fleet.

The upside: CityLab looks how the stalled to Las Vegas high-speed rail project could speed housing construction in California.

Link fares: How could Sound Transit reform its fare structure for light rail as Link expands?

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Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He is especially interested in how policies, regulations, and programs can promote positive outcomes for communities. Stephen lives in Kenmore and primarily covers land use and transportation issues for The Urbanist.