What We’re Reading: Just Peachy, Empty Streets, and Missing Link Saga

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Housing people: King County is planning to purchase hotels to permanently house people experiencing homelessness.

Failing gigs: With a new law on the books legitimizing gig workers as independent contractors, some California grocery stores fire their company delivery staff.

Just peachy: With both Georgia United States Senate races in the bag for Democrats, California high-speed rail may be better positioned for federal support and transportation investments in general across the country are likely to see much larger federal backing.

Duwamish Trail: Seattle Bike Blog explains how the proposed Duwamish Trail could make biking safer on East Marginal Way.

Hidden costs: Are there hidden costs of “overparking” cities?

90’s plan left behind: Did Boston miss out on better opportunities with an original Seaport plan?

Sweden ups ante: What is the “one-minute city”?

Parking failure: Streetsblog NYC says that New York City’s failure to add bike parking hurts businesses, increases theft, and reduces biking.

Ban guns: Washington’s legislators a looking at ways to limit extremist armed militia groups. Meanwhile, far-right state legislators have chosen to bring their guns to the capitol.

Empty streets: Traffic fatalities have been spiking during the pandemic. The New York Times explores why that might be ($).

Open questions: At least two Seattle police officers apparently were in Washington, D.C. during the attempted coup d’état that Trump encouraged.

Investing in public space: New York City’s High Line will be extended to Penn Station and Paris’ grand boulevard, the Champs-Élysées, is getting a greener and more people-oriented makeover.

Car lobby: A band of mostly Republican legislators want to prohibit a progressive option of tolling I-205 in Oregon.

Walkability by design: Does office space rules like those in Tysons Corner, Virginia limit walkability?

Fifty-year low: Due to the pandemic, Washington State Ferries ridership has hit a 50-year low.

Resignation: In response to the attempted coup d’état that Trump incited, transportation secretary Elaine Chao has resigned from office with only two weeks to go in the job.

Wind power milestone: For the first time, more than half of the United Kingdom’s electricity has come from wind power.

Missing Link saga: A Washington appeals court has heard arguments in the Ballard “Missing Link” case.

Land use intensity: Greater Greater Washington looks at what transit corridors can tell us about land use intensity in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Back to government: Portland’s former bike-friendly mayor Sam Adams is headed back to city government.

Walk freely: Jaywalking decriminalization is coming to Virginia.

Real estate recovery: In New York City, real estate has started to see signs of life and recovery amid the pandemic.

Ohio’s urban investment: Ohio has passed tax incentives for development in urban cores that could change skylines.

Bike parking exception: Should bike parking requirements be eliminated for permanent supportive housing developments?

DDI: Washington has unleashed another car-first interchange design in Lacey ($).

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Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He is especially interested in how policies, regulations, and programs can promote positive outcomes for communities. Stephen lives in Kenmore and primarily covers land use and transportation issues for The Urbanist.

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asdf2

Maybe someday, the Monorail can be converted into a Seattle High Line, once the trains running on it reach the end of their useful life. I think it would be quite popular, especially if access points were added every few blocks.

Adron

That may never occur. They just maintain the vehicles with custom parts/etc. The monorails, as is, are well past end of life. They’re over 50 years old!

But I digress, we should just BUILD a highline downtown. 😉