What We’re Reading: Circuitous Train, Virtual Schooling, and Olympic Architecture

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A view of Downtown Bellevue from the city’s main park. (The Urbanist)

Circuitous train: New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is getting his circuitous LaGuardia Airport train after all ($).

Public space remade: Providence is rethinking how to do public space across the city.

Permanent program: San Francisco is keeping parklets and street cafés, having made them permanent ($).

Bad rap: Paul Krugman argues that cities wrongly get a bad rap ($) and the economic consequences to society as a result.

TOD: Canadian federal minister Catherine McKenna talks about the importance of transit-oriented development in relation to Vancouver.

Big community benefits: A large redevelopment in Portland could have big community benefits.

Suing for accessibility: Disability advocates are suing Baltimore over sidewalk conditions.

Red hot: Redlined neighborhoods are more susceptible to harsher impacts from extreme heat events.

Solving the crisis: Katie Wilson argues what Seattle’s next mayor could do to solve the housing crisis.

Virtual schooling: Though Seattle Public Schools is returning to in-person teaching, there will be a virtual option for students and parents that want it.

Slow the cars: Will Virginia’s new plan to slow down drivers work?

Housing first: The Urban Institute shows how Denver’s housing first policies have been a success.

Carbon taxesque: A tax on carbon-intensive products from abroad has been proposed by Congressional Democrats.

Health Through Housing: Erica C. Barnett looks at King County’s “Health Through Housing” homelessness plan.

Peer solutions: In addressing homelessness, do New York City and Vancouver offer solutions that Seattle can follow?

Broken reporting: Streetsblog examines why American car crash reporting is so broken.

Bike the Highlands: Scotland has rolled out more bike carriages on a popular scenic train route.

Olympic architecture: See the architecture of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics venues.

New PDX car-free path: Portland’s airport is getting a new car-free path connection.

BOS of PBLs: Adding new protected bike lanes in Boston may have increased bike traffic by 80%.

SkyTrain rezone applications: Vancouver is allowing rezones near SkyTrain stations and now has a streamlined process to consider development applications that would require rezones.

Slowed growth: On the growth rate, suburbs in the Seattle area were growing faster than Seattle in 2020 ($).

Longevity: The New York Times has a nuanced opinion piece on how cities should approach the outdoor dining sheds going forward ($).

Bikeshare reduces costs: A new study suggests that American bikeshare programs save $36 million in public health costs each year.

Ban cars?: In Streetsblog, a column argues that to ban cars they should be socialized (à la carsharing).

Cop-free responses: A new Seattle public safety plan could provide for no-cop response to some 911 calls.

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Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He is especially interested in how policies, regulations, and programs can promote positive outcomes for communities. Stephen lives in Kenmore and primarily covers land use and transportation issues for The Urbanist.