What We’re Reading: A Second Station, ‘Mountain Lion’ Cities, and 100,000 Affordable Homes

0
Link train at Capitol Hill Station. (Credit: The Urbanist)
Link train at Capitol Hill Station. (Credit: The Urbanist)

Still hiring: Amazon is hiring another 12,500 workers in Seattle ($).

A second station: Capitol Hill nearly got second light rail station but those hopes were dashed.

Trading away transit: Jeff Davis of Eno Transportation explains how transit got traded away in the Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill.

Houston’s sprawl: Can Houston control its sprawl?

Terminate them: Anti-vaxxers who work for Washington State Ferries are hoping to cause chaos to block a socially responsible vaccine mandate.

Subways, not highways: An op-ed argues that the federal government should invest in the New York City subway, not highways.

Anchoring Anchorage: What can Anchorage’s new mayor do about housing in downtown?

Going backwards: A Philadelphia neighborhood is poised for rezoning, but it is at odds with the comprehensive plan and heads backwards.

“Mountain Lion” cities: What are the “Mountain Lion” cities growing in Western states?

Infrastructure debates: What should be federal priorities for infrastructure funding is highly debated today, but what were the debates back in the age of the Founding Fathers ($)?

Status quo reversion: Looking through the lens of San Francisco, an author shows how politicians talk about a big game on climate action but then run to the status quo.

Mask and vax up: King County will impose a mask mandate for large events outdoors this week; a recommendation to mask up outside is also being promoted. Two counties in Washington are also requiring vaccination proof to enter restaurants and bars.

Brownfield redevelopment: Crosscut covers how one of Washington’s most polluted sites is being proposed for redevelopment.

Act on climate: An Oregon representative has called on the state transportation department to take climate change seriously.

Vision for TOD: In Maryland county, a plan for big transit-oriented development along the Metro Blue Line has been outlined.

Microresurfacing: Portland is focusing microsurfacing treatments to streets designated as greenways.

100,000 affordable homes: The White House has announced a new plan for 100,000 affordable housing units.

Denser city living: The latest census shows a reversal of trends toward denser city living ($).

Love of cars: What is the real reason that Republican-leaning areas of the country love cars?

Narrow street requirements: Building narrower streets could help with building more affordable housing.

Resort town crises: On Orcas Island, a restaurant owner lived out of his car for a while to house two workers in his apartment to have staffing ($).

Uh oh: Renewal of Sound Transit’s CEO contract has been postponed several weeks.

Abolishing parking minimums: How did the Twin Cities eliminate parking minimums and how can other cities do it, too? San José could move toward elimination of parking minimums.

We hope you loved this article. If so, please consider subscribing or donating. The Urbanist is a 501(c)(4) nonprofit that depends on donations from readers like you.

Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He is especially interested in how policies, regulations, and programs can promote positive outcomes for communities. Stephen lives in Kenmore and primarily covers land use and transportation issues for The Urbanist.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments