Sunday Video: Fifth & Columbia

8

A fascinating look at the change in Seattle’s skyline and the future Fifth & Columbia project (due in 2016).

We hope you loved this article. If so, please consider subscribing or donating. The Urbanist is a 501(c)(4) nonprofit that depends on donations from readers like you.

Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He is especially interested in how policies, regulations, and programs can promote positive outcomes for communities. Stephen lives in Kenmore and primarily covers land use and transportation issues for The Urbanist.

8 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Matt the Engineer

Any news from this project? The design review was in 2008, this video is dated over a year old, and I would think the recently announced Rainier Square project would absorb some of the demand for a new tall building downtown. I’d love to see it built (more than almost any other project), but I question whether the 2016 date is real.

Stephen Fesler

All indications is yes: http://web1.seattle.gov/DPD/permitstatus/project.aspx?id=3007582
The associated construction permits have been issued. You’ll see on the right that they’re related to the land use application. Additionally, their website seems pretty serious. I’ll see if I can get a formal response from them though.

Matt the Engineer

Strangely, that page says their permit has expired and can’t be renewed. I’ll hope it’s just an administrative change to get a new permit. Then again, codes change quite a bit every 3 years.

Stephen Fesler

The underlying land use has an expiration, yes. But they already put in for the building permits before the expiration. Therefore, the building permits are still valid.

Stephen Fesler

Hah, guess that confirms it.

Scott Bonjukian

Great video! Architectural renderings and animation have come a long way.

I hosted a conference a couple years ago where Daniels was a keynote, and he talked in particular about this project. The design used to be a much more radical cantilever over the church next door, and now it looks a little more subtle. The bit of stone facade in the glass wall on 5th is a neat incorporation of history.

Stephen Fesler

Yeah, the overall plans seem really cool for the structure. I can’t wait for it to join the skyline–and for the pit to go away. 🙂