The saga continues with the Shoreline subarea planning process for the area around the future 145th Street Link Station, which is expected to open in 2023. Shoreline’s City Council will meet this evening to consider amendments to the proposed zoning map and development code that would guide growth in the station area for the foreseeable future. The Shoreline City Council has two general options to choose from in adopting a rezone map. The first option would be to adopt an area-wide rezone map similar to the one proposed by the Planning Commission in August while the second option would be to adopt a phased rezone map:

The recommended rezone map proposed by the Planning Commission. (City of Shoreline)
The recommended rezone map proposed by the Planning Commission. (City of Shoreline)
Proposed phase rezone map based upon the Planning Commission's recommend rezone. (City of Shoreline)
Proposed phase rezone map based upon the Planning Commission’s recommend rezone. (City of Shoreline)

As a refresher, the Mixed Use Residential (MUR) zones are largely tailored to allow the following types of development:

What types of development that MUR zoning could bring to the 145th Street Station area. (City of Shoreline)
What types of development that MUR zoning could bring to the 145th Street Station area. (City of Shoreline)

Councilmembers have already indicated an interest in making more than a dozen different amendments to the recommended zoning map proposed by the Planning Commission. The following is an overview of areas that could be amended:

Overview of possible areas where rezone amendments could be made indicated by black boxes, red line, and letters. (City of Shoreline)
Overview of possible areas where rezone amendments could be made indicated by black boxes, red line, and letters. (City of Shoreline)

We apologize for the poor image quality as it was naturally rendered as shown.

The following are just a few of the possible zoning map amendments that could be offered at the meeting:

Amendment A would remove MUR-35 zoning near Twin Ponds Park to R-6. (City of Shoreline)
Amendment A would remove proposed MUR-35 zoning near Twin Ponds Park to R-6. (City of Shoreline)
Amendment D would change select MUR-45 zones to MUR-70. (City of Shoreline)
Amendment D would change select MUR-45 zones to MUR-70. (City of Shoreline)
Amendment E would change one block of proposed MUR-70 zoning to MUR-45.
Amendment E would change one block of proposed MUR-70 zoning to MUR-45.

amendment-g

Amendment L would change all proposed MUR zoning north of 155th Street to R-6, except certain blocks. (City of Shoreline)
Amendment L would change all proposed MUR zoning north of 155th Street to R-6, except certain blocks. (City of Shoreline)
Amendment M would change select R-6 zoning north NE 158th St to MUR-35. (City of Shoreline)
Amendment M would change select R-6 zoning north NE 158th St to MUR-35. (City of Shoreline)

City staff have provided a helpful overview of the different amendments in the staff report with analysis on what each amendment would do and where there may be support for the change:

Summary of proposed zoning map amendments E through F1. (City of Shoreline)
Summary of proposed zoning map amendments E through F1. (City of Shoreline)
Summary of proposed zoning map amendments H through J. (City of Shoreline)
Summary of proposed zoning map amendments H through J. (City of Shoreline)

Some other possible amendments beyond zoning map changes include:

  • Reducing the proposed minimum net density per acre from 80 dwelling units to 48 dwelling units in the MUR-70 zone;
  • Providing greater latitude in MUR zones to allow existing single-family residential units to remain a conforming use;
  • Removing new single-family residential units as a permitted use in the MUR-45 zone; and
  • Adding a policy to seek a lid over I-5 or create new connections across.

The Council’s meeting kicks off at 7pm and discussion on the subarea plan is expected to start around 7:20pm. The Shoreline City Council’s decisions could weigh heavily on 145th Street Station both in terms of ridership and spurring transit-oriented development. Those who might want to guide the decisions of policymakers should show up early to provide public testimony.

We hope you loved this article. If so, please consider supporting our work. The Urbanist is a non-profit that depends on donations from readers like you.