Sarah Oberklaid

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Sarah is an urban planner and artist from Melbourne Australia, currently living in Seattle. She has contributed to diverse long-term projects addressing housing, transportation, community facilities, heritage and public spaces with extensive consultation with communities and other stakeholders. Her articles for The Urbanist focus on her passion for the design of sustainable, inviting and inclusive places, drawing on her research and experiences around the world.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heOuwXh0mAQ The inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennial launched yesterday, with three months of events, including lectures, workshops, tours, exhibitions, performances, film screenings and social activities. Titled The State of the Art of Architecture, the Biennial is the largest survey of contemporary architecture in North America. It is fitting that the city...
YouTube channeler 'Every Frame a Painting' showcases how Vancouver, B.C. (nicknamed Hollywood North) is dressed up by filmmakers to play a variety of other cities in movies. Similarities in architecture and streets combined with clever editing and props have helped tax-credit-seeking filmmakers to dress the Canadian city as everything...
Today marks the 10th year of the PARK(ing) Day movement, an international event which endeavors to highlight the need for more urban open spaces. PARK(ing) Day encourages people to transform car parking spaces into unique and temporary parks. The project has evolved and expanded since its inception by Rebar,...
Article Note: This is the second installment of a two-part series on laneways. See Part 1 for background on efforts to enhance Melbourne's laneway network including discussion of public realm initiatives. Melbourne, Australia is internationally renowned for its vibrant laneways, which are dotted with street-side dining, unique stores and residences, creating an intriguing maze of connections for...
Article Note: This is the first installment of a two-part series on laneways, see Part 2. “We need an approach that will see our cities repurposed by getting more from less: a re-timetabling rather than the grand engineering projects of the twentieth century.” — Rob Adams, Director City Design, City of...
Releasing data captured by government agencies in an accessible way to the public, has the potential to produce interesting insights about city life. Ben Wellington highlights how open data can empower citizens and help to make places better. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lz_kIDxbzGA
Bright colored cafe tables and chairs decorate two Seattle parks, Westlake and Occidental. Over summer, these parks have featured new experiences, as part of a broader initiative to activate and revitalize these public spaces. Food trucks, live music, ping-pong and foosball tables, fitness classes, play spaces, and an outdoor...
Ben Wellington uses data in innovative ways to tell interesting stories which enhance our understanding of cities. In comedic fashion, Wellington explains some of the quirky New York data sets he has mapped, and what they can tell us about the city. He demystifies the complexity of data, highlighting its...