On Thursday, the Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT) released its final design for a Neighborhood Greenway project in Crown Hill. The project would retain an existing pedestrian bridge over Holman Rd  NW at 13th Ave NW and create a new at-grade pedestrian crossing. The project would also include new stop lights in advance the at-grade crossing and curb ramps to facilitate mobility between sidewalks. The proposal no longer would move a southbound bus stop, which had been proposed in earlier iterations.

Final design of improvements. (City of Seattle)
Final design of improvements. (City of Seattle)

The new crossing should make it easier for pedestrians and bicyclists to get across the bus arterial. Currently, such road users must hike up and down the pedestrian overpass.

Over the past year, the proposal has been reduced in scope. At one point, SDOT had proposed removal of the pedestrian overpass, construction of two at-grade crossings, and bicycle detection for traffic signals. The original proposal came about from the local community through the Neighborhood Street Fund program. It was selected in 2016 for construction from among dozens of proposals across the city.

According to SDOT, construction of the improvements will occur in late spring and summer this year.

Title image courtesy of Selena Carsiotis.

Pedestrian Overpass on Holman Road to Stick Around

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Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for promoting sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He advocates for smart policies, regulations, and implementation programs that enhance urban environments by committing to quality design, accommodating growth, providing a diversity of housing choices, and adequately providing public services. Stephen primarily writes about land use and transportation issues.