Tobias Lau, of Social Action, described how prior to learning about the innovative research about social life and experiences in cities led by Danish architect Jan Gehl, he had considered city development as “something that happened in front of me. Not something I could take part in.” As Lau gained more insight from Gehl’s books while directing a film about his 50 years of research, to be shown at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art in Denmark, his perspective changed: “Suddenly, cities were not something I had to adjust to; the cities had to adjust to me.”

In making the film, Lau hoped to instill this same eye-opening experience on his viewers, transforming them into critical beings, active and engaged in the development of their city. The film, Life Between Buildings, has been transposed the film from the exhibition installation for the screen. It summarizes research conveyed in Gehl’s books and explains the importance of cities being designed to support human life.

Previous articleWhat We’re Reading: Bike Seattle
Next articleA New Transit Hub: Montlake Triangle
Sarah is an urban planner and artist from Melbourne Australia, currently living in Seattle. She has contributed to diverse long-term projects addressing housing, transportation, community facilities, heritage and public spaces with extensive consultation with communities and other stakeholders. Her articles for The Urbanist focus on her passion for the design of sustainable, inviting and inclusive places, drawing on her research and experiences around the world.