No free lunch: Mercer Island residents won’t be getting special access to I-90 high occupancy vehicle lanes says the state.

Staying wild: A Utah congressional representative has dropped his plans to privatize more than three million acres of federal land.

Cute and encouraging: Sound Transit’s transit tip cartoon animals are a good way to disarm transit etiquette.

For the wrong reasons: Uber’s CEO has decided to bail from President Trump’s national business advisory council after a massive campaign to dump Uber for collaborating with the authoritarian administration.

Double dipping: State Senator Doug Ericksen has a new administrator job with Environmental Protection Agency but plans to keep his senate gig, but is that really doable?

Economic devastation: Tim Eyman is eyeing a 25% cut in property taxes.

Highway removal: The Congress for New Urbanism has picked 10 urban freeways that they say need to come down in America.

Paramount duty: The education fight is gearing up in the Washington State Legislature.

Another kind of ban: Barcelona has put a ban new hotels in its city center.

Intentional outcome: How segregated school target=”_blank”built segregated cities.

Ending a deplorable policy: Washington state became the first state to sue the Trump administration over its unconstitutional immigration and travel ban which has halted the order nationwide.

Highly competitive: So far eight candidates are in the race for the open Seattle City Council seat (Position No. 8)

Overbuilt: According to Transportation for America, cities across the country are building way too much parking near transit.

Alive again: With Lobsang Dargey likely heading for prison, most of his projects have largely dried up, but the Belltown Potala Tower appears to have a new developer taking over.

Joining the club: Yakima claims itself as a “sanctuary city.”

Environmental injustice: The Dakota Access Pipeline has been pushed ahead by the Trump administration after being held back by the Obama administration.

Quiet threat: Did you know that 154,000 barrels of crude oil are transported through the Puget Sound area every day?

Just cause: King County Councilmember Rod Dembowski and Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell co-author an editorial against the proposed King County youth detention center.

Up for grabs: Seattle Central College has five sites ready for redevelopment.

Good for the coffers: Greater Greater Washington says that building apartments near transit boosts the coffers of cities and counties.

New policy: Mayor Ed Murray released his new plans for how to manage homeless encampments and sweeps.

Pre-paid: King County is testing pre-paid postage for ballots.

Gaining attention: With a major apartment boom underway in Tacoma, the city is beginning to get serious national attention.

Eco-friendly: Vancouver, B.C. plans to increase energy efficiency requirements for residential buildings less than seven stories in height.

Map of the Week: What if bike paths looked like subway maps?

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Stephen is an urban planner with a passion for promoting sustainable, livable, and diverse cities. He advocates for smart policies, regulations, and implementation programs that enhance urban environments by committing to quality design, accommodating growth, providing a diversity of housing choices, and adequately providing public services. Stephen primarily writes about land use and transportation issues.

1 COMMENT

  1. Bike maps that look like subway maps are great if it’s easy to follow the routes and their connections that way on the ground! Our signed/named bike routes and greenways often have decent wayfinding, but then they can also be hard to follow at important intersections or critical turns.

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